Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Best Practices for a Newbie

  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Vienna, VA
    Posts
    2

    Question Best Practices for a Newbie

    Hi All,

    I am a newbie and super excited to have just purchased a new crimson Genesis SE-410 (the model with the stainless steel grates) for a pretty good value in the off-season. Since this will be by far the nicest grill that I have owned, I was wondering if there was any collective wisdom when it comes to how to keep my grill in good working order. I think I know some of the obvious points, but would really like to get advice from others who have kept their grills in great shape for so many years. My grill will be delivered at the end of the week. In the meantime, my plan is to:

      • Buy a cover and keep the grill covered when not in use (I was considering a Kong cover over the Weber branded cover)
      • Scrape the grill down with wire brush when preheating
      • Rub the grates with vegetable-oil-soaked paper towels right before grilling
      • Replace the disposable drip pan regularly



    What else would folks suggest? I would really appreciate any advice on how to take care of my brand new grill.

    Thanks!
    Greg

  2. #2
    TVWBB Diamond Member LMichaels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Rockford IL
    Posts
    3,811
    Be sure to clean to drip pan and grease funnel areas. These are the cause of most all grease fire conflagrations and damage to a Genesis well any Weber gas grill

  3. #3
    TVWBB Diamond Member Bruce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,665
    Just regular cleaning out of the inside fire box area. You don't have to scrub it shiny clean, but just scrape the grease and gunk out good with a putty knife or other tool. Clean the gunk off the flavorizer bars from time to time and empty the drip pan regular will keep you with trouble free cooking for a long time. Regular cleaning of the outside will help keep the stuff from building up and causing problems. Don't use steel wool on stainless steel. But, some #0000 steel wool on the porcelain coated lid with a cleaner such as Simple Green will keep it looking brand new.

    Burn off the grease and stuck on meat and scrap your grates between cooks and you will be on your way. I don't care for grill covers as I feel they trap moisture under them. I much prefer keeping the grill in a covered area, but if not, then a cover is better than leaving it out with no protections for sure.
    Some people rescue dogs and cats. I rescue Webers.

  4. #4
    TVWBB 1-Star Olympian Rich Dahl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Prescott Valley, Arizona
    Posts
    11,929
    Good advice from Larry and Bruce. If you go with a cover make sure it has a few inches between the bottom of the cover and the ground for air circulation.
    "Rescuing just one dog won't change the world, but it surely will change the world for that one dog."

  5. #5
    TVWBB Pro Greg M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    SW MO
    Posts
    623
    I agree with everything above. But I'll also add something about the frame.

    To me the weak point is the frame. Meaning rust. Rust can happen even if the grill is kept covered. Especially if your frame cart has the enclosed bottom. If you get rust don't put off fixing it for very long. Sand it off, put on a rust preventative and repaint.

  6. #6
    TVWBB Wizard Jon Tofte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Hobe Sound, Florida
    Posts
    1,701
    Greg, Welcome to TVWBB forum. You have already gotten some great tips.

    I agree with Greg about frame rust being a sinister problem. In my experience it is especially prevalent in the legs that have casters. (The ones with just axle wheels are open on the bottom and drain much more freely.) I would suggest you consider removing your casters and pre-treating with a rust inhibitor inside the legs. Do an occasional inspection to see how your frame and especially leg bottoms are doing. Waxing the exposed metal of the outside of frame is another idea. It not only makes the metal look nicer it also helps wick off water.

    Larry and Bruce are so right about keeping the firebox and grease tray reasonably clean. A little seasoning is actually a good thing, so you don't need to go crazy, but gunked up stuff will prevent your grill from draining hot grease and lead to an eventual thermonuclear event!

    Best wishes on many years of enjoyable grilling. Most of us here are classic Genesis fans who don't have experience with the Genesis II grills. Maybe you can post some pictures and observations of how this new Weber works for you!
    Genesis Platinum Silver C Q1200"Flat-top" 26 Kettle Red,Black 22s Black '74 18, SJ. Projects: Skyline & 2 many others!

  7. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Vienna, VA
    Posts
    2
    Thanks, everyone, for the advice. I'm looking forward to getting started!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •